Life

Cool Spot: Purple Dragon – The Members Club for Families

June 16, 2010 by Natalie in Life, Places to go with 3 Comments

purple dragon loungeA recent visit to my local soft play had me wishing for eyes in the back of my head, attempting to split myself in two so I could attend to two children on opposite sides of the room, and guiding a hysterical Saria from the top of the enormous climbing frame down the “big scary slide” in Crystal Maze style – Forward, forward, FORWARD, keep going… I needed a big glass of wine and a sleep when I got home…

After that, I was ‘off’ play centres until Lu, the kids and I were invited to check out Battersea based private family club Purple Dragon, a 10,000 square feet contemporary play centre concept founded by mum of two Sharai Meyers. Launched in November 2008, she was inspired by her four year old son and the alienating play spaces they visited – She wanted to create a space for families. I’d heard a bit about the club but I was still thinking ‘Surely all play centres are a pain in the bum?’. Turns out, they’re not!

Once I’d navigated getting out of Battersea Park station (very pushchair unfriendly) and located the almost blink and you’ll miss it club on the corner of a residential street and Battersea Park Road, I was buzzed in and immediately blinking in amazement.

purple dragon dolls houseCalm, large white space, very friendly staff at the reception, an enormous fish tank as you come through the barriers (possibly the cleanest tank ever), contemporary sofas surrounded by bookcases filled with delightful coffee table reads and all the latest magazines – I wanted to move in and I hadn’t even seen what was on offer for the kids!

Divided into zones (0-3, 4-7, 8-12 years), we made a beeline for the Maze Play Zone. If you imagine a space with BG’s favourite toys and designers – it’s heaven. Chock full of pretend play and small world delights by Plan Toys, Kidscraft, Brio, Pintoy and other familiar names with several pretend play kitchens, shops, market stall, shopping trolley, a giant wooden dollhouse, a large train set table, touch screen Mac’s that have been customised in the US, a dressing up corner, and soft play, you could easily spend most of your time here. Seating is strategically placed beside the maze to get a birds eye view, but there’s staff on hand in every zone to entertain and keep an eye on the kids, acting as those eyes in the back of your head that you’ve been wishing for.

A garden next door to the maze where they can play football, mini golf, or drive around on Little Tike cars and bikes, or play in the mini shed was a hit, and there’s also a mini garden where the kids can learn about plants and grow their own flowers and veg.

purple dragon wet play zonepurple dragon changing room

Walk through the enormous purpose built space and there’s a changing room with warmed baby wipes and everything you need, the juice bar, mini play sections filled with fantastic baby toys and soft mats for them to play with the toys or chill out, as well as a reading room stuffed full of captivating reads. A custom built wet play zone designed by the same guy behind the one at the Science Museum is a mini individual’s fantasy – Nia in particular could not get enough of this room.

purple dragon music roompurple dragon reading room

The music room has drums, a keyboard, lots of instruments, and the option to record a CD, plus across the way there’s an art room with easels, tables, and three sinks at various heights to suit even babies. There’s a wall where the kids all draw on it and every few months it gets painted over. They teach classes and run activities in each of these rooms (there’s also a mini people sized kitchen for cookery classes), do face painting, and there’s even a self-contained kindergarten, plus a room that can be used for parties, sensory classes, or exercise. Did I mention that you can even book an appointment in the beauty room?

There’s little people sized toilets, a large tiny world table in the corridor where delights from Plan Toys such as their cars, the airport, garages etc can be played with, a dinosaurs table, a Nintendo Wii gaming zone, a laptop bar and WiFi, and a very cool enclosed indoor trampoline. Lunch was cooked by their resident Michelin-starred chef in the restaurant where they have mini tubs of Stickle bricks and drawing goodies to keep them occupied and the kids sit in Mamas and Papas Luna highchairs. All organic, the kids devoured pasta and chicken (and chips), while I had succulent chicken with salad and juicy mango and Lu had a salmon salad.

As a measure of how much we enjoyed it, a few days later we spent Saria’s 3rd birthday there. The boyf is also a fan now and enjoyed watching the cricket on Sky Sports (yawn) with some of the other dads, playing table football and air hockey, ‘making’ music, and romping around with the kids.

It’s a friendly, relaxed atmosphere and yes, there are some very posh folk there and I can imagine there might be some keeping up with the Jones but you can get that anywhere. There’s a lot of nannies, kids wearing white, and it’s frequented by celebrities – we bumped into a very famous band member on our way in. A number of the parents were really chatty and I overheard Dads saying that they escape to the club at the weekend and arranging to meet friends. Normally these places are very oestrogen-centric, but there were lots of dads about when we went which was quite refreshing.

Basic membership starts at £28 a week (excludes classes and extras like food), but there are all sorts of membership options, plus a day rate option of £40 per child. To be fair, it costs the day rate and more for a child to go to a childminder/nursery in London/Surrey! It’s not in the league of your typical play centre, cost or experience wise, and the best value is to to be had out of membership and living nearby, although it’s certainly great for occasional treat days.

Purple Dragon has tapped into design conscious, play centre weary, experience hunting parent’s desires. It is a ‘posh club’ but it’s more that it totally bucks the trend of jarring primaries, formulaic layouts and giant climbing frames with questionable safety and instead is totally focused on learning and experiencing through play and making the visit a family affair. Sharai has thought of everything and created an amazing concept and is planning to open a club in North London and looking at other spots around the UK and abroad.

Thanks to Sharai, Shosh and the team for having us!

FavoriteLoadingAdd to favorites

Tagged , ,

3 Comments

  1. LucyJune 17, 2010 at 12:04 amReply

    I second all of that – it’s an amazing space for kids and well worth it for a treat day. There is so much to do – I can’t think of one thing I’d add or change about it (except I’d move it to Brighton).

    PS: I’d forgotten about the video – hilarious!

  2. mariaJune 17, 2010 at 11:10 amReply

    It sounds great and not expensive at all for all those facilities. It’s great there are spaces and activities for older children too. Definitely worth a try. My son would be really happy painting on the wall and making the most of the music room!

  3. Amanda at NubieJune 17, 2010 at 6:53 pmReply

    What an amazing place – I recently saw an article on an amazing children’s club in Japan and thought if only ! please bring this one to Brighton !

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

Please note we don't accept comments that are of a promotional or advertising nature (it's unfair to someone we have featured to hijack their post), nor do we accept spam, and please be respectful towards the author of the post, other commenters, or the person featured.

GET A DAILY UPDATE OF POSTS BY EMAIL
More Bambino Goodies

Disclaimer
Please note that all prices quoted on product posts are correct at time of publishing.
Published By CrackerJack Productions

Copyright 2007 - 2014 Bambino Goodies/Crackerjack Productions, All rights reserved.

Design by Lula Creative. Written permission is needed for resuse of logo or images where the original owner of the work has asserted their own copyright terms.